German Courses
 

Fall 2015

Winter 2016

Spring 2016

 

 

 

19     Is a Nonviolent World Possible?
Fiat Lux Freshman Seminar
Robert Kirsner
Reading and discussion of Michael N. Nagler's provocative book The Search for a Nonviolent Future (2004), first edition of which won 2002 American Book Award (now translated into French, German, Italian, Croatian, Korean, Hebrew, and Arabic.) Many U.S. citizens think of Gandhi as an ascetic idealist whose non-violent campaign may have worked against the British in India in the 1930s and 1940s but would not have stood a chance against Hitler, Stalin, or tyrants of today. Others, however, looking at fact that the U.S. continues to spend billions of dollars to wage wars abroad while neglecting the health and well-being of many of its very own citizens, believe that some form of nonviolence might well be our only hope for civilization in the long run. Prof. Nagler, now Emeritus, taught comparative literature and founded the Peace Studies program at UC Berkeley. He is co-director of the Metta Center for Nonviolence Education. His book is well worth studying, if only for questions it raises and assumptions it questions.

115    19th-Century Philosophy
John McCumber
German philosophy, which may generally be characterized as philosophy that takes activity rather than passive subsistence to be fundamental nature of all things, is one of Germany's greatest gifts to humanity. Exploration of first half of two-century history of German philosophy -- period from Kant to Nietzsche, including Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Marx.   Taught in English.

140     Language and Linguistics
Christopher Stevens
Theories and methods of linguistics, with emphasis on structure of modern standard German, its phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Other topics include diachronic, spatial, and social variation of German (i.e., its historical development, dialectology, and sociolinguistic dimensions).  Enforced requisite or corequisite: course 6.  Taught in English with German proficiency required.

152     Conversation and Composition on Contemporary German Culture and Society I
Magdalena Tarnawska
Structured around themes as they emerge in contemporary German texts ranging from news magazine articles to literature, with emphasis on speaking and writing proficiency. Presentation software featured.  Requisite: course 6. Taught in German.

263     Seminar: Literary Theory
Urban Humanities: Disasters and Aftermaths
Maite Zubiaurre and Todd Presner

495     Approaches to Foreign Language Pedagogy
Magdalena Tarnawska
Issues include development of current theories of second-language acquisition, effects of these theories on language teaching, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, assessment techniques, use of multimedia in foreign language pedagogy, and design of syllabi for basic foreign language courses.

 

Winter 2016      Tentative Schedule

59     Holocaust in Film and Literature
David Kim
History of Holocaust and its present memory through examination of challenges and problems encountered in trying to imagine its horror through media of literature and film.  Taught in English.

61A     Modern Metropolis: Berlin
Todd Presner
Cultural, political, architectural, and urban history of one of most vibrant and significant cities in world. Exploration of city over 800 years, using innovative mapping tools to understand how Berlin evolved from fortified mercantile town into global city.  Taught in English.

116     20th-Century German Philosophy
John McCumber
German philosophy, which may generally be characterized as philosophy that takes activity rather than passive subsistence to be fundamental nature of all things, is one of Germany's greatest gifts to humanity. Exploration of second half of two-century history of German philosophy -- period from Nietzsche through Habermas, including Heidegger, Gadamer, Jaspers, and Frankfurt School theorists.  Taught in English.

141     Current Topics in Germanic Linguistics
Christopher Stevens 
In-depth investigation of one topic in field of Germanic linguistics, such as phonetics and phonology, morphology and syntax, semantics and pragmatics, social and spatial variation (i.e., sociolinguistics and dialectology of German), or history of German.  Enforced requisite: course 152. Taught in English with German proficiency required.

153     Conversation and Composition on Contemporary German Culture and Society II
Magdalena Tarnawska
Structured around themes as they emerge in contemporary German texts ranging from news magazine articles to literature, with emphasis on speaking and writing proficiency. Presentation software featured.  Requisite: course 6. Taught in German.

159    German Cultural Studies
Magdalena Tarnawska
Exploration of German culture in different historical contexts. Examination of various cultural spaces, practices, and standpoints as staged in literary and nonliterary texts, with emphasis on constructions of sex and gender, memory and national identity, and ethnicity and race. Analysis of ways of seeing, thinking, and talking about these issues as manifested in several cultural debates that dominated public discussions in Germany (and Europe) for several weeks, months, or even years (e.g., debates about admission of women to universities at end of 19th century, reconstructing/preserving sites of memory in postwar Germany, and headscarf and integration in contemporary Germany). Requisite: course 152 or 153.  Taught in German. Most readings in German; some theoretical readings in English.

213     Topics in Literature and Film
David Kim
With focus on two different modes of cultural representation, examination of topics in German literature and film from Weimar Republic to present. Study of media theory, feminist film theory, and interrelationships between film, literature, and social history.

233     Old Saxon
Christopher Stevens
Introduction to study of earliest documents in Old Low German. Readings in "Helíand" and study of "Old Saxon Genesis."

M264     Topics in Communicative, Cognitive, and Functional Approaches to Linguistic Analysis
Robert Kirsner
Readings, discussion, analyses, and validation procedures within sign-based linguistics, cognitive grammar, and discourse-functional approaches to language. Consideration of impact of grammaticalization theory on various nonformal approaches to synchronic linguistics. Discussion of work by Contini-Morava, Diver, Garcia, Goldberg, Janssen, Lakoff, Langacker, and Verhagen, as well as Bybee, Traugott, Hopper, and others.  Requisite: course C142 or C238.

 

Spring 2016      Incomplete

56    Figures Who Changed the World
David Kim
Introduction to strains of German philosophy and political thought that resonated internationally. Use of version of "great man" model of history to move beyond such models in its understanding of how, exactly, intellectual currents actually ferment change in world.  Taught in English.

175     Intercultural Germany: Literature, Politics, Migration, and Culture
Magdalena Tarnawska 
Exploration of issues surrounding immigration and intercultural identity in Germany since 1960, with focus on period after 1990. Examination of various cultural spaces, practices, and standpoints as staged in literary and nonliterary texts, with emphasis on constructions of ethnicity, nation, race, class, and gender. Analysis of several political and cultural debates that dominated media and public discussions in Germany and Europe for several weeks. Discussion of several literary texts by Turkish German and other minority/intercultural writers. Examination of hip-hop minority music and culture as voices in political debates. Exploration of contemporary controversies around Islam in Germany. Reading of several theoretical pieces that examine relationships between immigration, globalization, culture, and identity.  Taught in German. Most readings in German; some theoretical readings in English.

191C     Capstone Seminar
Magalena Tarnawska
Limited to senior German majors. Collaborative discussion of and reflection on courses already taken for major, drawing out and synthesizing larger themes and culminating in paper or other final project. Requisites: courses 140 or 141, 152, 153, 158, and four upper division electives required for major.  Must be taken in conjunction with one course numbered 140 or higher.

202B     Readings in Middle High German Literature
James A. Schultz
Introduction to medieval German literature and literary history and to use of contemporary theory in study of medieval texts. Continued practice in reading Middle High German, although most texts to be read in modern translation.

260     Seminar: Modern Period
Urban Humanities: New Public Spheres
Todd Presner and Maite Zubiaurre

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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