Courses Offered This Quarter

The UCLA Department of Germanic Languages offers a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses in English and German. For information about specific section times and locations please view the UCLA Schedule of Classes.

For a complete listing and description of department courses visit the UCLA General Catalog.

Winter 2018: Language Courses

Yiddish 10: From Old World to New: Becoming Modern as Reflected in Yiddish Cinema and Literature

Instructor: Miriam Koral

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Use of media of Yiddish cinema (classic films and documentaries) as primary focal points to examine ways in which one heritage culture, that of Ashkenazic Jews, adapted to forces of modernity (urbanization, immigration, radical social movements, assimilation, and destructive organized anti-Semitism) from late-19th century to present. Exploration of transformational themes in depth through viewing of selected films, readings, research and weekly papers, and in-class discussions. P/NP or letter grading.

German 1: Elementary German – Beginning

Instructor: Varies

Lecture, five hours. P/NP or letter grading.

German 2: Elementary German – Continued

Instructor: Varies

Lecture, five hours. Enforced requisite: course 1. P/NP or letter grading.

German 4: Intermediate German

Instructor: Varies

Lecture, five hours. Enforced requisite: course 3. P/NP or letter grading.

German 5: Intermediate German

Instructor: Varies

Lecture, five hours. Enforced requisite: course 4. P/NP or letter grading.

Dutch 103B: Intermediate Dutch

Instructor: Cisca Brier

Requisite: course 103A. Practice in grammar, listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Course is taught in English and Dutch.

German 154: Business German

Instructor: Magdalena Tarnawska Senel

Seminar, three hours. Required of all German majors who are candidates for general secondary instructional credential. Content varies by instructor and may include advanced work in folklore, film, and German studies. Letter grading.

Winter 2018: Courses in English

German 59: Holocaust in Film and Literature

Instructor: Renata Fuchs

Lecture/screenings, five hours; discussion, one hour. History of Holocaust and its present memory through examination of challenges and problems encountered in trying to imagine its horror through media of literature and film. P/NP or letter grading.

German 19: Bearing Witness: Interviewing Holocaust Survivors

Instructor: Todd Presner

Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

German 116: 20th-Century Philosophy

Instructor: John McCumber

German philosophy, which may generally be characterized as philosophy that takes active rather than passive subsistence to be fundamental nature of all things, is one of Germany’s greatest gifts to humanity. Exploration of second half of two-century history of German philosophy — period from Nietzsche through Habermas, including Heidegger, Gadamer, Jaspers, and Frankfurt School theorists.  Taught in English.

German 141: Current Topics in Germanic Linguistics

Instructor: Christopher Stevens

Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 152. Taught in English with German proficiency required. In-depth investigation of one topic in field of Germanic linguistics, such as phonetics and phonology, morphology and syntax, semantics and pragmatics, social and spatial variation (i.e., sociolinguistics and dialectology of German), or history of German. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

Winter 2018: Courses in German

German 187: Undergraduate Seminar: Franz Kafka: Fiction, Genre, and Reality

Instructor: David D. Kim

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Use of media of Yiddish cinema (classic films and documentaries) as primary focal points to examine ways in which one heritage culture, that of Ashkenazic Jews, adapted to forces of modernity (urbanization, immigration, radical social movements, assimilation, and destructive organized anti-Semitism) from late-19th century to present. Exploration of transformational themes in depth through viewing of selected films, readings, research and weekly papers, and in-class discussions. P/NP or letter grading.

Winter 2018: Graduate Courses

German 265: German Philosophy: Hannah Arendt

Instructor: John McCumber

Seminar, three hours. Taught in English. The aim of this graduate seminar is to examine Hannah Arendt’s monumental work in political theory with an emphasis on the connection between forms of government and the precarious lives of others — Jews, the stateless, pariahs. What she explains in reference to political action, the public sphere, amor mundi, moral judgment, individual or collective responsibility, violence, and literature is at the heart of humanistic and social scientific scholarship today, and in this course students will evaluate this intellectual foundation within a comparative and transnational context. Letter grading.

German 2G: Elementary German for Graduate Students

Instructor: Renata Fuchs

Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisite: course 1G. Preparation for Graduate Division foreign language reading requirement. May not be applied toward degree requirements. S/U grading.

German 200: Research Methods – Enlightenment and Anti-Enlightenment

Instructor: David Pan

***INTERCAMPUS EXCHANGE COURSE WITH UC IRVINE***

To enroll, please contact David Tse-Chien Pan (dtpan@uci.edu). We can provide details about transportation arrangements. In addition, you will need to complete an intercampus exchange form.

According to Immanuel Kant, “Enlightenment is man’s emergence from his own self-incurred immaturity.” The uniform development of humanity implied in this dictum is based on the idea that reason can provide a secure basis for judgments that can replace the pronouncements of traditional authorities. While Enlightenment thinkers believed that they had found a rational basis for culture that could be used against the tyranny of authority and cultural prejudices, their anti-Enlightenment detractors suspected that the idea of a progress of humanity would not only threaten the spiritual foundations of culture but would also create its own tyranny by implying a hierarchy of cultures. The debate between these two camps continues to drive today’s discussions about whether one views humanity as collaborating on a single project or as a diversity of potentially clashing cultural forms and trajectories. This course will consider texts by both Enlightenment and anti-Enlightenment writers in the 18th century in order to map out the terms and the stakes in the debate concerning reason vs. tradition as alternative bases for the organization of human society. Key themes in the course will include the possibilities and limits of human reason, the question of cultural diversity, and the relationship between law and sovereignty. Readings by Goethe, Hamann, Herder, Kant, Schiller, Lessing.

German 230: German Cinema

Instructor: Kai Evers

***INTERCAMPUS EXCHANGE COURSE WITH UC IRVINE***

To enroll, please contact David Tse-Chien Pan (dtpan@uci.edu). We can provide details about transportation arrangements. In addition, you will need to complete an intercampus exchange form.

This survey course on German film history spans roughly the time from the end of the First World War to the end of the Second World War. The seminar pursues three main goals:

1. We will analyze a series of significant films of this period–from Robert Reinert’s Nerven (1919) to Peter Lorre’s Der Verlorene (1953).

2. We will discuss films by Wiene, Lang, Murnau, Ruttmann, Pabst, Riefenstahl, Harlan, Käutner, and others in the context of their socio-political and cultural history (the role of cinema in the Weimar Republic, Nazi Germany, and postwar WWII German society), the history of film art (genre, form, style), and the changes in film technology, film production, and business practices. For this purpose we will read a wide variety of shorter political, theoretical, and literary documents that addressed and influenced central developments in politics, culture, and film during these periods of German history–from Simmel to Schmitt; Arnheim to Kracauer; Hindenburg to Hitler; Tucholsky to Musil.

3. We will consider how best to organize, structure, and teach undergraduate courses on Weimar cinema, Nazi cinema or postwar cinema. Students will prepare