Education

  • Ph.D. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Research

BOOKS

  • The Origin of Language. 2016. Self published.
  • An Historical Analysis of Directional Adverbs in Fourteenth Century Southwestern German: A Study in Historical Dialectology. Göppingen: Kümmerle Verlag, 1992. Pp. xii + 222. [= Göppinger Arbeiten zur Germanistik, no. 570.]
  • On the Bifurcation and Repression Theories of Germanic and German.  Journal of Indo-European Studies Monograph, No. 29. Edgar C. Polomé and Richard Diebold, editors. Washington, D.C.: Institute of Man, 1998. Pp.xiv + 98.

 

TRANSLATIONS

  • Translation of poem into Gothic for Endgame:  The Calling by James Frey and Nils Johnson Shelton. New York: HarperCollins Publishers. P. 184 (2014).
  • Translation of a page of text into Gothic for Endgame:  Sky Key by James Frey and Nils Johnson Shelton. New York: HarperCollins Publishers. P. 420 (2015).
  • Translation of a text into Gothic for Endgame:  volume 3 by James Frey and Nils Johnson Shelton. New York: HarperCollins Publishers. Forthcoming.

 

WORKS IN PROGRESS

  • Book: On the Grammaticalization of the Word (in preparation)
  • Articles: “On the locus of grammaticalization in Old English roots.”

Selected Publications

Publications

Articles

  • “The Derivational Suffixes and Suffixoids of Old Saxon: A Panchronic Approach to a Linguistic Category.” American Journal of Germanic Linguistics and Literatures 12.1:53-79 (2000).
  • “More Prefixes and Prefixoids of Old Saxon and Further Examples of the Grammaticalization of the Old Saxon Root.” Leuvense Bijdragen 91:301-318 (2002).
  • “The Prefixes and Prefixoids of Old Saxon: On the Grammaticalization of the Old Saxon Adverbs and Prepositions. Leuvense Bijdragen 93:151-178 (2004).
  • “Revisiting the Affixoid Debate: On the Grammaticalization of the Word.” In Grammatikalisierung im Deutschen, edited by T. Mortelmans, T. Leuschner, and S. Groodt [= Linguistik — Impulse und Tendenzen, 9.] Berlin: de Gruyter. Pp. 71-84 (2011).

On Research and Teaching

Professor Stevens’ first book was An Historical Analysis of Directional Adverbs in Fourteenth Century Southwestern German: A Study in Historical Dialectology. He has also published on theory in reconstruction (in articles and my book, On the Bifurcation and Repression Theories of Germanic and German).

And Professor Stevens have published several articles on grammaticalization theory (on modal verbs and affixoids) that try to answer the simple question ‘where does grammar come from?’.  Recently, he has become interested in the origin of human language and have self-published a book on this topic, as well. While we can’t, of course, know precisely how language originated, we are finally at a point where we can say quite a lot about it, and this area has also become a battleground for he formalist vs. functionalist debate in linguistics.

The origin of language is a topic of wide interest to many fields, so Prof. Stevens teaches it as a lower division, general education course for all to take. All other courses (at the upper division and graduate level) are on the linguistics of German, its history, dialects, sociolinguistics and on theory in language variation and change. He also teaches graduate courses on Old High German, Old Saxon and Gothic. For the past few years Professor Stevens has co-directed the UCLA summer Study/Travel program in Vienna, Munich and Berlin, which focuses on the language and culture of these extraordinary cities.